DEAF DOG TRAINING

DEAF DOG TRAINING

DEAF DOG TRAINING
Many people find it difficult to live with a deaf dog and impossible to communicate with. This is purely prejudice. Deaf dogs can also communicate and even be trained properly with their owners.
I can tell you this much, when I was 7 years old, the first dog I owned and trained at that age, Daisy, was a 100% deaf Bolognese Terrier. Moreover, when we bought it, it was close to 1 year old and we were its 4th owner. Although I had no knowledge of dog training, I taught him basic commands with hand signals at that age, and an unbelievable bond was formed between us. We could even play hide and seek together, which was our both favorite game. Based on my 13 years of experience with him, I can say that; If a primary school-aged child can communicate and train a deaf dog without any knowledge, don't think it's impossible for you and your friend with a disability. 


Daisy, 1995-2008
If you have a deaf dog, you are in luck! Because deaf dogs are more attached to their owners than hearing dogs. The reason for this is that the only person he can communicate with and understand in his small world is the leader, the owner. Also; Deaf dogs are highly intelligent, their noses and perceptions are also quite strong. They almost yearn to understand and communicate with you. There is very little you can't teach when you take enough care of him and give him your love.
Studies have shown that deaf dogs can read our facial muscles as we speak. This means that you do not have to be mute and expressionless when communicating with your dog just because he is deaf. Saying "well done" and smiling when he does something positive, and then rewarding him will help him understand what the right behavior is. In the same way, if you frown and say "no" when you do something you don't want, and invite him to your side, after a while, he will give up that behavior. 
How Are Deaf Dogs Trained?
We use two separate training methods to train deaf dogs. One of them is communication with sign language (hand gestures), and the other is a method that we call touch training, which involves touching certain parts of your dog's body and conveying the command we want to him. Both methods make it possible for us to give your dog obedience training with sufficient patience and correct communication. In addition, vibrating collars (not electrical, only vibrating!) are also very helpful in teaching us "no" in our work with deaf dogs. As with hearing dogs, training for deaf dogs should begin when they are still puppies. The earlier you start training your deaf dog to adapt to the outside world, socialize it, and strengthen its bond with you, the easier and more enjoyable life will be for your dog and for you.
Deaf dog training is not much different from training a hearing dog; but it takes extra patience. Deaf dogs are more sensitive than hearing dogs. Their education and upbringing require more rigorous work. If you own a deaf dog and need professional support to live a better quality of life with him, please contact me.