My Dog Is Extremely Lethargic: Causes and Ways to Help Her

My Dog Is Extremely Lethargic: Causes and Ways to Help Her

If your dog is lethargic, looks tired, or refuses to play as usual, it may not be just laziness. Pets that show signs such as appearing extremely sluggish or exercising intolerance may have a serious underlying problem. This can be caused by a serious illness, especially heart disease. If your dog seems extremely sluggish or just less active than usual, it's important to pay attention to these cues. Read on to understand why your dog can't stand exercise and what to do about it. Possible Causes of Extreme Fatigue Brown dachshund with orange flying disc in mouth, running in park. It's normal for some dogs to slow down a bit after intense activity. For example, after a long day at the dog park or a tough hike, your dog may want to spend a day or two sleeping. However, prolonged fatigue should not be neglected. Exercise intolerance is just one of the warning signs of big problems like heart disease; but it can also indicate a range of other problems, from mild problems like muscle pain to serious diseases like chronic heart failure. Vets Now lists a few potential reasons why your dog may be extremely sluggish: A disease such as an infection, parvovirus, or kennel cough heart ailments Liver ailments diabetes or hypoglycemia hypothyroidism parasites Side effects of drugs poisoning or trauma Dog walking service and dog advice site Wag! says exercise intolerance, along with other symptoms such as loss of appetite, coughing or fainting, can be a sign of pulmonary hypertension (high blood pressure in the lungs) or another cardiovascular disease. Symptoms of Exercise Intolerance and Extreme Fatigue in Dogs It's usually pretty easy to notice if your dog is acting sluggish. Vetinfo states that excessive sleepiness, low energy, lack of excitement, and delayed response are clear signs of an extremely sluggish dog. Exercise Intolerance can hardly be noticed, especially if you don't regularly walk or play with your dog. In milder cases, your dog may not want to go as far or play as much as they normally do, Wag! points out. Coughing, heavy breathing, or difficult breathing after physical activity can also be signs of exercise intolerance. In severe cases, confusion, disorientation, accidents in toilet training, increased body temperature, shivering and even collapse may occur. What You Should Do to Help If you notice that your dog is acting extremely sluggish or unable to withstand normal levels of exercise, it's important not to force him to run. Follow the tips he gives and let him stop playing or cut the walk short if necessary. Monitor your dog closely and watch for any other serious symptoms. If you observe any other worrisome behavior, you should consult your veterinarian immediately. If your dog is not showing any other symptoms, wait a few days. Consult your veterinarian if your dog's energy is not returning or his condition is worsening. However, if he exhibits extreme symptoms such as fainting or collapse, take him to an emergency clinic immediately.